Category Archives: American Poets

© 2023 . All rights reserved.

Reading for LiVE MAG! #19 at the Jefferson Market Library, May 7, 2023

… Jeff Wright and Lori Ortiz have curated another LiVE MAG!, one of the consistently best art literary magazines around. I love LiVE MAG! You can catch its flavor in the Vimeo below. Enjoy.     Check out LiVE MAG! … Continue reading

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James Barickman reads from Helluva Season

James Barickman is a sound technician at the Poetry Project where he is responsible for capturing the words of poets as they speak them every week in the Parrish Hall or the Sanctuary, a daunting task that I have watched … Continue reading

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Jim Feast reads from (a strange awakening of light that takes the place of dawn)

The work Jim Feast did in his early twenties in Chicago, (a strange awakening of light that takes the place of dawn), is a testimony to the grit and will of a young man who wants to be a poet. … Continue reading

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Gerald Wagoner reads from A Month of Someday

… In Brooklyn near the Gowanus Canal, Gerald Wagoner has been hosting a popular reading series for several years now that he calls The Persistance of Cormorants; so it was only fitting that, with the publication of his debut chapbook, … Continue reading

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Dipika Mukherjee reads from Dialect of Distant Harbors

At KGB in NYC not too long ago, I enjoyed hearing Dipika Mukherjee read from her newest book, Dialect of Distant Harbors, and wanted to get her on the blog. She had just flown in from Chicago and was flying … Continue reading

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William Considine reads from Continent of Fire

When I began to read William Considine’s new book, Continent of Fire, I was immediately drawn to a poem early on called “Library and Book Sale.” It made me want to read more. It is about falling in love with … Continue reading

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Alicia Ostriker reads from The Old Woman, the Tulip, and the Dog

Alicia Ostriker’s The Old Woman, the Tulip, and the Dog begins with a quote by Gertrude Stein: A very important thing is not to make up your mind that you are any one thing. The Old Woman, the Tulip, and … Continue reading